Judith Massie, center, and Nila Rudrow, right, are pictured here, chatting with John Theurer, a member of the Tri-State Gas Engine and Tractor Association’s board of directors. Massie and Rudrow also are on the board. They are the first mother/daughter duo to serve. (The Commercial Review/Rachelle Haughn)
Judith Massie, center, and Nila Rudrow, right, are pictured here, chatting with John Theurer, a member of the Tri-State Gas Engine and Tractor Association’s board of directors. Massie and Rudrow also are on the board. They are the first mother/daughter duo to serve. (The Commercial Review/Rachelle Haughn)
They wear their yellow shirts and orange hats with as much pride as the rest of them.

But they're not like the rest of them.

They're different.

They're unique.

They're the first mother and daughter duo to serve on the board of directors of the Tri-State Gas Engine and Tractor Association.

Meet Nila Rudrow and Judith Massie.

Nila has been secretary of the board since 2005, and her daughter has been in charge of the trading post since 2008.

"It's enjoyable," Nila said of working the Tri-State Gas Engine and Tractor Show with her daughter. "It's kind of interesting."

"We're together almost every day," Judith said.

The engine show bug bit Judith when she was about eight years old. She became a member of the association in the late 1980s.

Nila came to the shows for about two years, then decided to join the organization. She has been a member for about 40 years.

"I like going around and seeing the different tractors and stuff," Judith, 49, said of the show.

"It's interesting to meet the people and find out where they're from," Nila said.

The two said they fit right in with the mostly-male association.

"We're not treated differently," Judith said.

"You're just one of the bunch," her mother said.

There was a time in the early years of the tractor and engine association when the idea of having women on the board of directors may have been unfathomable.

"I can remember when it was all men," 69-year-old Nila said.

"Women have become involved in the last 10 years," Judith estimated.

Today, there are two other women serving on the board of directors.

As much as Judith and Nila love tractors, it's no surprise that they decided to become involved with the tractor and engine association. Tractors are in their blood.

Judith grew up around tractors. Her father, Ronald, had his own repair shop for farming equipment at the family's home. Nila helped with the business.

Also, Ronald worked for a Minneapolis Moline dealer.

The family's love for tractors later translated into a love for the tractor and engine show.

"I guess my dad became involved (in the show)," Nila said. "It was kind of a family thing.

"(Today), the whole family is involved," she added.

"My kids work at the trading post," Judith said of her 17-year-old daughter and 14-year-old son. "Their baby beds were set up in the toy trailer," she said, with a chuckle. Along with running the trading post, the family sells antique toy tractors at the engine show.

Nila said she remembers bringing Judith and her brother to the show when they were children.

She remembers that on one August day, her son told her he was sick. She couldn't figure out what was wrong with him, so she took him to the doctor.

"He said there was nothing wrong with him. He had engineshowitis," Nila said, laughing.

Today, the only school Judith has to worry about missing is her job as an instructional assistant substitute for the Jay School Corporation.

When she isn't working, Judith is busy running the trading post. Meanwhile, her mother is in her lime-green office building, trying to keep up with all of the new memberships.

The association has about 2,000 members worldwide. Nila has to keep track of address changes and writes four newsletters per year. During the show, things really pick up.

She estimated that 90 percent of new memberships are sold during the annual show. "The phone rings off the wall," she said.

Nila and Judith only stay overnight at the show during the weekends.

During the week, they go home each night to their homes that are close to the tractor and engine show grounds and close to each other. The mother and daughter only live a half-mile apart.

Even if they lived several miles away from each other, that probably wouldn't keep them apart.

"We do a lot of things together," Nila said. The two like to go shopping and go out to eat. Their favorite restaurant is Ponderosa Steakhouse.

"We've always been close," Judith said.