In this May 29, 2015, photo, Jay County High School sophomores Jake Myers, left, and Jacob Geesaman collided causing the baseball, which is near Myers’ right leg, to fall to the ground during the third inning of the Class 4A Sectional 6 semifinal game against the Wayne Generals at Homestead. A trio of errors and a lack of offense ended the Patriots’ season with a 7-1 loss to the Generals. (The Commercial Review/Chris Schanz)
In this May 29, 2015, photo, Jay County High School sophomores Jake Myers, left, and Jacob Geesaman collided causing the baseball, which is near Myers’ right leg, to fall to the ground during the third inning of the Class 4A Sectional 6 semifinal game against the Wayne Generals at Homestead. A trio of errors and a lack of offense ended the Patriots’ season with a 7-1 loss to the Generals. (The Commercial Review/Chris Schanz)
Editor’s note: Sports editor Chris Schanz has taken thousands of photographs since the summer of 2013. In this “Photo Focus” series, he will take a look back at a handful of his favorite pictures and describe the story behind them.

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Baseball is a game of failure.

As a batter, failing seven out of 10 times is deemed successful. Failing one fewer time is deemed elite.

But coming up short at the wrong time can be the difference between a win and a loss.

Defensively, however, the name of the game is perfection. Mishaps are part of the sport, and although they happen, they may not have an impact on the outcome of a game.

If a squad is able to minimize those defensive lapses and not let them compound, it increases their chance at victory.

Baseball, though, is a mental game. Continued failure at the plate can lead to a prolonged hitting slump. Conversely, one error in the field sometimes has a penchant for leading to more.

Teams can overcome poor hitting by playing solid defense. On the other hand, contagious hitting has the ability to negate sub-par defense.

When a team is unable to come through at the plate during crucial times and defensive errors continue to mount, the team is destined for a defeat.

There’s no worse time for such an event to happen than the postseason, when a loss marks the end of the road.

The Jay County High School baseball team found out first hand on May 29, 2015.

It’s the Class 4A sectional semifinal against the Wayne Generals at Homestead in Fort Wayne.

Jay County’s offense had opportunities to score early but wasn’t able to convert on the chances. It didn’t get its first hit until the fifth inning, and by then Wayne was up 7-0.

Part of that deficit for the Patriots was the result of two errors that led to a four-run third inning for the Generals.

One of those was an infield collision between a pair of sophomores attempting to make a catch.

Jake Myers threw a pitch to the inning’s leadoff hitter, Deyonne Hunter, and Hunter popped it up about 20 feet up the first base line. Catcher Jacob Geesaman and Myers both charged toward it, heads to the sky tracking the ball but unaware of one another’s whereabouts on the infield.

Neither player called the other off, and both reached to make the catch. Myers had it in his glove momentarily before the Jakes collided with one another.

Geesaman’s left elbow caught Myers on the left side of the face. Arms still extended, their armpits met.

The force of the impact pushed Geesaman’s upper body back, nearly knocking his legs straight out from under him. At the same time, the ball became dislodged from Myers’ glove.

Geesaman had long since deposited of his headgear, and the crash sent Myers’ cap falling to the ground. On the way down, Geesaman’s mitt slid down the side of Myers’ face, the same side that had been hit by his teammate’s elbow a split second earlier.

Captured at 1/4,000th of a second, the moment was frozen in time.

Geesaman’s glove on the grimacing face of Myers.

The hat a foot off the grass giving in to gravity’s pull.

The baseball, which had it stayed put in Myers’ glove would have been an out, followed the same path as the cap and is stopped in action above Myers’ right knee.

The error was followed by another — an errant pickoff throw during the next at bat — and those defensive mishaps compounded for the Patriots as the implosion that day was in full effect.

Collisions between players aren’t supposed to happen in baseball. The only impact in the sport should be bat to ball or ball to glove.

So when two players collide, resulting in an error, it generally makes for a compelling, interesting photo.

There’s no need to try to guess what is going on in the frame. Two players collided and they didn’t catch the ball.

What is happening in the picture is clear.

Those elements are key to a successful and impactful photograph.